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20130101
20130131
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
jeffrey toobin. betsy, your thoughts, you didn't actually watch the second part of the interview, but now on the totality of what he has said, your thoughts tonight? >> yeah. i didn't. i couldn't watch the interview tonight not because i didn't want to, i taped it, i will watch it. i have been asked a lot, and for me it's a sense of relief more than vindication, but it's a tremendous sense of sadness. yesterday i was obviously visibly upset, and today it's -- as you said, it's a sense of sadness. >> sadness about what? >> it, how it has affected so many people in such a destructive way. that's why. i mean, it hurts -- obviously it has a toll on lance. so many people in the saga have been hurt. i don't know if you touched upon greg for example. his children, people who just defended him to the ninth or the tenth, whatever you say. he hurt the sport of cycling. he caused it irreparable damage. >> after all he did to you, do you feel sorry for him? >> yeah, i kind of do. >> does that surprise you? >> yeah, considering last week i wasn't showing -- it was more eye for an eye, tooth for the to
jeffrey toobin. the oath he takes, jeffrey, is different than the presidential oath? >> it is much longer around has none of the eloquence and grandeur of the very brief presidential oath, which is mandated in the constitution. >> explain why? >> only 35 words. >> the presidential oath. >> the presidential oath there is no vice presidential oath called for in the constitution. what the -- but long in the late 1880s decide there had should be a vice presidential oath, too, but maybe this is a lesson about congress. congress made it much longer, more complicated. no one would even attempt to memorize the vice presidential oath. so john paul steven, who administered the oath four years ago, add card and i'm sure sonia sotomayor will have a card to read it to the vice president. >> you worked for four presidents, david gergen, so take us a little bit inside this vice presidential ceremony we are about to see. for joe biden, who spent a lifetime in politics, eventually becoming the vice president of the united states and now a second term this is huge. >> it's very big. yesterday exthere was a
boys and our senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin. rosalind, let me begin with you. posting these things online, we have got to understand is that what it's looking like to me is that there's a lot of boys in this community who do not have faith in the adults, that they will do the right thing. they have taught them the basic necessities and rules of how you conduct yourself. >> and just to sort of dof tail off of that, dr. drew, jump in here. i know that you have a very strong opinion about alcohol and how that fuels the flames but let me tell you, alcohol has been around for a long time and this is one of those stories that sort of beats the rest. >> yes. we should all be disgusted and we should all be scared to death because here's what all of us that are parents are standing here doing, not my kid. but the fact of the matter is we live in a world that we don't know that, pornography has been raining down on these kids and they are treating particularly women, these young men, as objects because that's what they get on the internet these days and unless you actively parent against tha
, doping, cover-ups and winning at all coasts. also bill strickland and senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin. first blush, what do you think? >> it's the most painful, successful therapy session in television. it's riveting. >> have you ever seen armstrong so uncomfortable, so nervous? >> he looks like he's strapped to the sift plane that's crashing. he's not giving it up. occasionally there are flashes where it seems like he's genuinely self-reflecting. a lot more pauses and hair splitting, as she said. >> do you think he's telling the truth, the full truth? >> no, i don't. clearly at parts -- in our book we recorded very clearly that armstrong was the kingpin there. he made a phone call to basically end tyler hamilton's career. he had the number of the uci president in his pocket. after tyler hamilton beat him in an important race before the tour. he had hamilton hauled in and busted for doping. that type of power was what he wielded. >> armstrong seems to indicate he wasn't forcing people, pressuring people to dope but that goes against the testimony of numerous former teammates. >> exact
kate boulduan, jeffrey toobin and i are. christi paul is not that far away. christi where are you? >> madison and pennsylvania avenue. this crowd has been waiting for this because you know the announcer, charlie brattman, he is an institution here. i would like to say, he is spitting enthusiasm. he doesn't have that broadcaster's voice that some people might think but you can hear how excited he felts about this. he's been doing it for years. he's been telling them for last hour, we're getting ready, folks, he's almost here. and broadcasting, that's what we like to call a deep tease. so these folks have been ready and waiting for some time. as we're waiting to see the president come by. i was talking to you earlier about the five branches of the military standing here. they've been standing here since 9:00 this morning. in kind of an informal relaxed pose. but once some of the bands started coming through and the color guard, that immediately changed. we saw them saluting. and they're now in, you know, a very rigid format as they're supposed to be. getting ready to salute again as
and i'm sure a lovely man but you are wrong. jeffrey toobin is here. >> i'm not sure about either of those things but, okay, go ahead. >> i will say this, what rush limbaugh is saying is something that is being echoed across this country. people are panicking, an executive order is very powerful but it cannot supercede the constitution. >> nor can it supercede a law that congress has passed, for example. there was an assault weapons ban from 1994 to 2004. president obama on his own by executive order cannot impose an assault weapons ban. congress has to do that. only congress can pass a law. all an executive order can do is use power that congress has already given to the president in a different law. >> even the most ardent and fervorous of the nra supporters will say, for crying out loud, enforce the existing laws out there. isn't an executive order an excellent tool to do just that? >> that's what presidents do with executive orders? >> one executive order that is apparently under consideration is the federal government does do some background checks on some weapons purchases.
analyst jeffrey toobin. rosalind, let me begin with you. posting these things online, you don't have to tell your children that you're not allowed to rape for them to know that you are not allowed to rape. so what is it about teen boys -- and again these are allegations but what is it about the teen boys that they would think it's okay to do this and for those who didn't do it to post it and brag about it or joke about it? >> well, i think there's a minority of boys who think this is okay and a lot more boys who have no idea what to do about it. and sometimes boys laugh because they are uncomfortable and they are feeling like i have no idea what to do. and i think the reason they don't know what to do is two reasons and one that i think is most important that is going on here. these boys feel if they said anything about it, that they would not be believed, or the adults in the community would not take care of it. and what i'm hearing from these people is even if it's not rape. let's just say that's not the case. do you actually want boys to conduct themselves and have relationships w
's legal analyst jeffrey toobin is here to help us understand a little bit more why. >> walk us through this. why, for example, i know it's the tradition, he's being sworn in today in a few minutes within five minutes here right behind us at the white house. why can't they do the pomp and ceremony, the speaking tomorrow, but not have another oath, another swearing-in ceremony. they have it, is that because of tradition. >> they can. it's just a matter of tradition. legally it doesn't mean anything. this is the seventh time in american history that january 20th has fallen on a sunday and the president and chief justice decided let's do the oath ceremony privately and have the party the next day. >> so that's why they're doing it today. >> correct. >> the one we're about to see is the big deal. >> this is the one that is legally significant. this is the real oath of office. >> last time around, the inauguration the swearing-in was famous for more than one reason. one of them being that the oath was flubbed a little bit. let's listen to it and i want to talk about it. >> are you prepared t
the sandy hook shooting. more on the perspective from margaret hoover, and peter barnhart and jeffrey toobin. jeffrey t is different seeing these two reports and these two different incidents, it is sort of a rorschach test, it is a tough debate on how this task force is. >> if you notice, the first story was about a police officer, she happened to be not on duty. she was a police officer, no one disagrees that police officers should have guns, and she said her training kicked in. i bet you guys looked long and hard for a story like that. but the one you saw doesn't do any damage to the pro-gun argument, because it was a police officer. i don't think anyone is arguing that police officers, perhaps even off-duty police officers should be armed. the second one is the actual situation that you get when you have lots and lots of individuals running around trying to play vigilante. >> it is interesting, there were others e-mailing us, saying we were afraid to tell that story, because they point to us as a sign that people being armed is a good idea, kind of to address the conspira speear theories
in jeffrey toobin. the gun lobby says this is all about the second amendment. where is the legal line between the so-called individual right to bear arms and government responsibility to look after people? >> well, michael, i am going to give you a ringing i'm not sure to that answer because the supreme court has not really classified th clarified this. in 2008 the supreme court said there is a constitutional right under the second amendment to possess a hand gun in your home for self protection. how does that apply to larger weapons? how does it apply to weapons outside the home? how does it apply to background checks for the purchase of weapons? these are legal questions that remain open now. it is probably true that assault weapon bands would have no problems constitutionally. because the supreme court has really changed the understanding of the second amendment and people can read it on the screen or at least they could, that is a level of legal uncertainty as well as the political uncertainty about how this debate will be resolved. >> we have the vice president holding the meetings this
legal analyst jeffrey toobin. >> it is sort of a rorschach test. it's a sign of how tough this debate is. >> if you notice, the first story was about a police officer. sheep happened to be not on duty but she was a police officer. no one disagrees that police officers should have guns and she said her training kicked in. i bet you guys looked long and hard for a story like that butt one you found was actually one that i don't think does any damage to the pro-gun control argument because it was a police officer. i don't think anyone's arguing police officers, perhaps even off duty police officers shouldn't be armed. the second one seems to be much more like the actual situation you get when you have lots and lots of individuals running around trying to play vigilante. >> we picked that story because there are all these conspiracy theorists e-mailing us saying we were afraid to tell that story because they point to that story as a sign or indication of people being armed is a good idea. you say there's more common ground and things that the president could do by executive order that the nr
states. >> reporter: cnn senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin wrote a book about this awkward moment in presidential history titled "the oath." did they need to do it, again? >> no one knows. >> really? >> no one knows to this day because the legal significance of the oath remains kind of a mystery. so, they just said, look, someone could file a lawsuit, someone could make trouble. we don't want to spend the first week, the first month of the obama presidency litigating whether he's president. so, let's just do it. it's slightly embarrassing, it's slightly weird. we'll do it again, and we'll put the issue behind us. >> reporter: an awkward moment between men with similar backgrounds in the law, but widely differing opinions about how it should be interpreted. both obama and roberts are graduates of harvard law. both known for their intellect and charm. but roberts was tapped to sit on the supreme court by george w. bush and is known as a staunch conservative who helped push through the controversial citizens united ruling, that corporations are people, too, dramatically shifting the
, actually, you're talking to jeffrey toobin. jeff toobin and i, we were together. we were sitting together in the cold in front of the white house when they walked down pennsylvania avenue close to the end of the parade. it was that same kind of nervousness, nervous tension that everyone was showing, and they're all out of their vehicles. that's one of the things you remember because you've got that tenseness in your stomach, but at the same time, people cheering and crying when they actually had a choons to get out and see them up close. that's one of the things that, of course, we'll be watching out here on ninth and pennsylvania. they don't announce exactly where it's going to be. tradition traditionally, it's where it's taken place. also in front of the white house, they'll get out of their vehicles again and walk into that glass encasing, that little house they've actually built on the lawn, where the first family will celebrate at the end of the day as well. >> suzanne malveaux with the best spot right there for the parade. thanks, suzanne. appreciate that. let's get right back to jo
. looks like he is speaking -- is that the justice? ruth bader ginsburg on the left part. jeffrey toobin and kate bolduan. he has been criticized a little bit for not supposedly schmoozing enough with members of congress. there is kathleen sebelius, the secretary of health and human services, members of his cabinet are inside the room as well as the republican and democratic leadership and others. you can see the head table, the vice president joe biden sitting there with dr. jill biden. >> this is actually a very interesting lunch pairing right there. >> what is nice, jeffrey, you have all three branches of government at this luncheon on capitol hill right now. >> it's wonderful. and it was actually a very sad occasion four years ago because both senator edward kennedy and senator -- hold on, hold on. the chairman of the inauguration committee, chuck schumer of new york is going to be speaking now. let's listen in, because he is going to be offering a toast. >> i hope everyone has enjoyed the lunch. i think we really deserve a round of applause to our chef and our caterer, all the peopl
. the intrigue of the case is very well described in a recent book by jerry too by -- jeffrey too toobin "the oath." it's a must-read look for those of you interested in this area of the law. notwithstanding ledbetter, the national enforcement of the laws seeking to level the playing field is not very encouraging today. federal trial courts are generally hostile to the title vii plaintiff. she has a host of hurdles which she must survive. first, the court has reversed to basically the old common law pleadings, something which i thought had been largely abandoned by the time i graduated from law school 45 years ago. but now it's back to the effect of demoralizing various things, and many cases are disposed of on the basis of this -- [inaudible] v. ashcroft case and motions to dismiss are granted fairly often. it's happened to me. um, then when you survive the motion the dismiss, the next hurdle is summary judgment. because at the end of the discovery period the defendant's going to file a motion for summary judgment, and judges are directed by the higher courts now to devote extreme attention
the criminal justice system works and sometimes doesn't. and jeffrey toobin has written the definitive history called "the oath" which is out now. there's anonymous and then the case. let's talk about anonymous first. is that illegal, what they have done? >> it's hard to know exactly what they have done. it is illegal to hack into other people's accounts. so potentially, what they did was illegal. the interesting, then, law enforcement challenge is what do you do with this information that's come to light? some of it clearly is inadmissible or irrelevant like that idiot who is talking about his daughter. i mean, he doesn't appear to have been involved in this. he was just someone from steubenville talking about it. he is apparently dropped out of ohio state and has expressed regret about what he said. but the social media stuff involving the alleged defendants, the actual defendants and other witnesses, that's potentially very relevant and it's important that prosecutors see all that's out there. >> mark, could this in some way impact the case? the fact that you have, you know, outsiders on so
including james mann, the obama and of the struggle inside the white house are redefined power, jeffrey toobin, the obama white house versus the supreme court and michael gruenwald's the new new deal, the hidden story of change in the obama era along with bob woodward's the price of politics. i want to ask both of you, did up woodward's most recent book get the attention the most of his books get? >> guest: my feeling is that it got initial attention but that it was crowded out by just the nature of the news cycle happening so initially at least to my mind there were a couple of nuggets that have not been reported before that there wasn't that many other ones that emerged after the initial one or two so it lost some of its momentum. i'm sure bob will have an equally subjective answer on this front too. >> guest: i mean, there is always a standard of what you're comparing it to. bob woodward it was not his most commercially successful book. i think sarah touched on two things. one is the news cycle has -- and the other factor was the topic. it was about the negotiations over the budget,
at bicycling magazine, has written about armstrong for years and cnn legal analyst jeffrey toobin. you have been in touch with armstrong since that interview. i guess in the last 24 hours. what can you say about what he said? >> i we had an exchange, last noilt night, he asked if i watched the interview. >> did he think you might not be watching? >> i gave him my opinion of what i thought he had done right, and the parts i thought he was wrong about. and we had, i would say, kind of a respectful exchange about that. this morning, we had another one. and it ended with something i thought was very interesting. he kind of signed off by saying, work to do. >> what did you take that to mean? >> it could mean a number of things. it could be as we're saying, that he does indeed see this as a process. but it is lance, and always i'm aware that he might be using me with a goal in mind, so he might be just trying to get me to let people think that, you know, there's a process. >> one of the things you said last night after we were getting off the air, you have covered him, really, he has dominated yo
of the united states. >> reporter: cnn senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin wrote an entire book about this awkward moment in presidential history titled "the oath." did they need to do it, again? >> no one knows. >> really? >> to this day because the legal significance of the oath remains kind of a mystery. so, they just said, look, someone could file a lawsuit, someone could make trouble. we don't want to spend the first week, the first month of the obama presidency litigating whether he is president. so, let's just do it. it's slightly embarrass, it's slightly weird. we'll do it, again, and we'll put the issue behind us. >> reporter: an awkward moment between men with similar backgrounds in the law, but widely differing opinions about how it should be interpreted. both obama and roberts are graduates of harvard law, both known for their intellect and charm. roberts was tapped to sit on the supreme court by george w. bush and known as a staunch conservative who helped push through the controversial citizens united ruling that corporations are people, too. dramatically shifting the wa
jeffrey toobin, there was a bit of a miscommunication. the chief justice had it planned out where he was going to pause and that information was sent to the inaugural committee and he ended up interrupting the chief justice, which seemed to throw chief justice john roberts off and he threw in faithfully, the word in the oath, but in the wrong place and that's why it was redone as the white house said out of an abundance of caution at the white house. i think they'll be on the same page this time. >> that was kind of interesting to watch because we were all waiting to see what was going to happen next. let's move on to cnn's jim acosta who is at the parade staging area and he's going to have one of the great inaugural broadcast locations during monday's festivities. he's going to be on a flat bed truck in the parade just right ahead of the president's limousine. imagine that. jim, tell us what's going on where you are this morning as they all prepare for the big parade. >> yeah, i hate to brag, gloria, but i'm going to have the best view in town. just in front of the president's motor
jeffrey toobin. jeffrey, there are so many questions here. first, let's start with what is the next move? >> well, he will either ask the full appeals court to hear it, or go directly to the supreme court. you know, this is a very technical legal issue. but when you cut through the goobleddy gook, this is a defeat for president obama and huge victory for the republicans in the senate. this say recipe for president obama to not be able to get through many of his executive appointments if this decision stands. >> these three people were seen to be pretty controversial because of their views and maybe, in some people's opinion, too pro union. and what now would be the republican response to this? >> well, they don't have to do anything. they won. president obama appointed these people. they were not approved by the -- by the senate. so what president obama did, he did what presidents have done for decades, which is he appointed them during a recess. they did a recess appointment, which means they can serve for about a year. what this court did, these three conservative republican judges, th
by jeffrey toobin, the obama white house and the supreme court, it is a must read but for those of you interested in this area of the law. the prospect of the judicial enforcement involves the playing field isn't very encouraging today. they are generally hostile to the title seven plaintiff. she has a host of kernels that she must survive. first the court has reversed to basically the old common law, something which i thought had been largely abandoned by the time i graduated from law school 45 years ago but now it's back to the effect of many cases on the basis of this ashcroft case working to dismiss. it's happened to me. then when you survive, the motion to dismiss at the end of the discovery period judge's order to avoid the high court's now to devote extreme attention and the judges do and therefore and to dismiss it is usually dismissed on some. for the fortunate one that survives against the jury verdict there is the usual motion for judgment notwithstanding the verdict and fairly often they are granted. for the extremely who survives the general, the employer then appeals to t
was the successful prosecution of john gatti of the crime family. jeffrey toobin, a former prosecutor himself, worked alongside white. >> mary jo combines really impressive intellectual distinction with street smarts. she knows which juries will like and how to allocate the resources to the most important cases. >> today she's best known for her dogged pursuit of terrorists as the first u.s. attorney to head for a southern district. >> the message that stands and i hope it's unmistakable, we will not tolerate terrorism in this country. >> white got attention for high-profile terrorists in the 1993 world trade center bombing, even inditing president obama for bombings before 9/11. her office prosecuted terrorists back in the 1990s. >> we did that because we perceive this to be a long-term danger. >> now the president has asked her to be the sheriff of wall street. >> the s.e.c., a long and vital force for the markets has a lot of hard and important work ahead of it. >> that hard work may also include having the last word on the excesses of wall street and the financial turmoil of the past five years.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)